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Best High-Protein Grains To Eat

Eating high-protein whole grains is a healtshful choice for several reasons. For starters, everyone needs protein for healthy muscles, bones, metabolism, weight maintenance, and immunity. Choosing whole-grain sources of protein not only fulfills this essential need but also provides the body with significant levels of fiber and antioxidants—nutrients that may not be as readily available in animal proteins. Also, eating grains that are high in protein can help those who are vegetarian or follow a plant-based diet make sure they’re consuming enough protein daily.

Also, eating grains that are high in protein can help those who are vegetarian or follow a plant-based diet make sure they’re consuming enough protein daily. And lastly, many of these protein-rich grains are lower in calories and fat than a lot of animal-based proteins like meat and dairy products. Here are best high protein grains to eat;

Teff

Teff is a superfood grain native to Ethiopia and is the foundation of many Ethiopian dishes. For instance, if you’ve ever had injera—a fermented, spongey Ethiopian bread—then you’ve had teff in flour form. You can also buy teff in its whole grain form in most stores and can cook it into soups, stews, or porridges.This grain is not only protein-rich (almost 10 grams per cup), but it’s high in fiber and nutrients like iron, calcium, and potassium.

Wild Rice

Wild rice isn’t like your typical bowl of white rice. This grain comes from the seeds of an aquatic plant that grows in certain lakes in rivers in Canada and the United States, and it provides a slew of tasty benefits.Whereas white rice is highly processed and stripped of most of its nutrient density, wild rice remains high in protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals.

Kamut

Known as the “traditional grain of Egypt,” Kamut Khorasan wheat (also just called Kamut) is an ancient whole grain you may want to consider stocking up on. It has almost 10 grams of protein per serving, is high in fiber, and contains around 15% of your recommended daily intake of iron.You can find Kamut in whole grain form (known as berries) at most stores, which you can cook with boiling water and use in salads or soups, or as a side dish. You can also sometimes find Kamut cereal, which you can cook and eat as a hot porridge.

Sorghum

Sorghum isn’t as common of a household grain as something like rice or quinoa, but this whole grain is packed full of protein, with around 10 grams per serving.You can eat whole-grain sorghum as a side dish or inside of a soup or salad, or you can enjoy “popped sorghum,” which can be used in the same way as popcorn and can be popped right on your stovetop.Aside from containing protein, a serving of sorghum also has 6 grams of fiber and is a rich source of nutrients like copper, iron, and vitamins B1 and B6.

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